Movies Anywhere is Great for Consumers

Thursday, October 12th 2017

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In early 2014 Disney announced a surprisingly reasonable approach to their digital movie sales: Buy it once, access it on many services. “Disney Movies Anywhere” ensured that when bought one of their movies on any of iTunes, Amazon, Google, or Vudu, you also got it on the other three services at no extra charge.

Ever since then, Disney movies (including Marvel and Star Wars) are the only digital movies I’ve been willing to buy. If any one service went out of business, I knew I’d still be able to access the movies elsewhere. And since this coincided roughly with the time my daughter started watching Disney movies over and over again, I had to know they wouldn’t disappear into the void.

Even when DMA dropped support for Microsoft’s movie store recently, purchased & linked movies weren’t removed from your Microsoft account. Very reasonable.

As a bonus, DMA meant digital movie sellers could actually compete with each other on price. I don’t use Vudu, but if they put a Disney movie on sale I could buy it and watch it on my iPad via iTunes.

Sure, the Ultraviolet movie locker service has been around longer and did similar things, but it never had direct integration with platform-specific services like iTunes and Google Play. DMA was a breath of fresh air.

Today it got even better – Disney Movies Anywhere is now simply “Movies Anywhere“, since Disney added new studios to the mix. Fox, Warner Bros, Sony, and Universal movies now sync across services too!

That leaves Paramount and Lionsgate as the holdouts, and yes it’s slightly annoying to have to scrutinize a movie’s studio before I buy it, but this is still huge. I had a number of movies trapped in Vudu that I got via free promotions over the years, but I never watched them because I hate Vudu’s apps so much. Now those movies are also safely stashed in my Google, iTunes, and Amazon accounts.

And I’ll say it again: I can buy movies at lower prices from different stores when they go on sale! For example: The Lego Batman Movie is $2.49 on Amazon right now, so I bought it and watched it tonight via Google. The same movie is $19.99 elsewhere. This sounds simple, but it’s new territory for digital movies.

I’m strangely excited about this. Go sign up for Movies Anywhere. Link your various accounts and they’ll even give you a pile of free movies right now.

12. October 2017 by Chad Haefele
Categories: General, Ramblings, Tech | Leave a comment

How to Fix Google Home’s Shopping List (again)

Monday, June 5th 2017

ifttt logoA few months ago I wrote about how to fix Google Home’s shopping list when I ran into an unusual error.

Two weeks after that post, Google removed the shopping list’s integration with Google Keep entirely. It now saves your shopping list to a weird isolated Google Express webapp, which notably has no offline access.

Without offline access, I can’t use the shopping list in a number of stores with poor cell signal.

Boo Google, this was an awful decision clearly done just to push shoppers toward Google Express. I could rant for a while about how much this decision bugs me. (This also eliminated the only reason I used Keep.)

But there’s a fix! Thanks to the magic of IFTTT, you can hijack Google Home’s voice commands and do something else with them instead. I wrote some applets there that save my shopping list items to the Todoist app instead of the Google Express webapp.

In the interest of sharing, here they are:

Create an IFTTT account, link it to your Google and Todoist accounts, and you’re off.

Note that you’ll need to set up both applets to get it to work with more variations on the voice command – IFTTT doesn’t let you specify enough variations in one applet alone.

05. June 2017 by Chad Haefele
Categories: General, HowTo, Tech | 1 comment

How to Fix Google Home’s Shopping List

Friday, March 24th 2017

June 2017 update: This doesn’t work anymore, Google made major changes to how shopping lists work on Google Home. See this updated post.

I love my Google Home! I switched from the Echo a while back, largely for two things:

  • Chromecast integration
  • A much better shopping list app

(I could go on a looooong rant about how much I hate the Echo’s companion Android app.)

But lately the Home’s shopping list functionality started failing me. It worked fine until about a month ago, when it got very confused:

I kicked it off with the usual “Hey Google, add cheese to my shopping list”. After a 5-10 second pause, Home almost always told me it didn’t understand what I was asking. If I tried again, sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn’t.

To make matters worse, sometimes the Home was actually adding items to my shopping list when it told me it wasn’t.

Here’s how I fixed it:

  1. In Google Keep, delete the note that Home uses for your shopping list.
  2. Use a voice command to add something to your shopping list.
  3. Home will re-create the shopping list note
  4. Now it works just fine! No more lengthy delay or failed commands.

Important note: This will obviously delete all the items on your original shopping list.

I still don’t have any hard evidence for what causes this, but here’s my theory:

I had more than 350 items that I’d added to that list and then checked off as I bought things. All of those items were technically still part of the list, just hidden from view. Maybe that got too large for Home to handle?

Who knows. But I’m going to delete the list every couple months from now on.

As I’ve written before, I like to document tech fixes – especially when my usual searches for help failed me. With a little luck this’ll fill in some Google gaps.

24. March 2017 by Chad Haefele
Categories: General, HowTo, Tech | 1 comment

My Recent Webinars

Thursday, December 8th 2016

florida library webinars logo - a bird and a computerThis year I’ve had a great opportunity to present a series of webinars for Florida Library Webinars. I love that they record all webinars and publish them freely online afterward! I’ve neglected posting links to mine here, so here’s a catching-up list:

I plan on doing at least a couple more webinars with them, including an introduction to Google Tag Manager in early February.

08. December 2016 by Chad Haefele
Categories: Presentations, Tech | Leave a comment

UNC Libraries UX Blog

Thursday, June 9th 2016

My posting frequency dropped off a cliff lately, but this time there’s a legitimate reason!

Following the lead of other Library UX departments like NYU and UVa, at UNC Libraries we’ve got our own departmental blog to talk about our work and other related areas. Check us out over there.

09. June 2016 by Chad Haefele
Categories: HP Updates, UNC | Leave a comment

Spring Webinars on Usability Testing & WordPress

Monday, February 22nd 2016

8c20ccc1d53c5bd8bb8b15b50bafe2a1I’m excited to announce two free webinars I’m doing this spring with ASERL – one in March, and one in April. Registration (again: free!) is open for both. Recordings will be available afterward. (And I know March 11th isn’t technically Spring, but I like to pretend it is.)
 

Assess Your Website Cheaply or Free

Friday 3/11, 2PM EST
Register

You don’t have to break the bank to test your website! This webinar will introduce you to tools that you can use for free to remotely get in the heads of your users.

You’ll learn about common remote usability testing techniques like:

  • Card sorting
  • First click testing
  • A/B testing

Services like Optimal Workshop and others make it possible to use all these techniques at low or no cost. And you can do it all remotely without even placing a burden on your staff. In this webinar you’ll get an introduction to these tools and hear about how they’ve been used to improve the UNC Libraries website.


Building an Academic Library Website in WordPress

Monday 4/11, 2pm EST
Register

WordPress isn’t just the most popular blogging software in the world, but also a powerful content management system that runs more than 23 percent of all websites. The current version alone has been downloaded more than 30 million times, and the WordPress community has built more than 43,000 plugins to extend and enhance the system. Academic Libraries are using WordPress to create community-oriented websites, blogs, subject guides, digital archives, and more.

This practical session will walk you through the entire process of creating a basic WordPress website for your library, including:

  • Setting up a simple WordPress website from scratch
  • Selecting a theme and customizing the look of your site
  • Using plugins to enhance and improve your WordPress site
  • Maintaining and updating your WordPress website for the long haul

You’ll also learn about how UNC Libraries migrated their website to WordPress, including challenges encountered and tips learned along the way.

22. February 2016 by Chad Haefele
Categories: Libraries/Info Sci, Presentations | Leave a comment

Library Technology Essentials Webinar

Wednesday, September 9th 2015

logo_500x500[1]Tomorrow afternoon I’ll be doing a webinar with some of my co-authors in the Library Technology Essentials series. I’ve got 6 minutes and 40 seconds to talk about why I love WordPress and what’s covered in my book, Pecha Kucha style. This is my first time presenting in this format, and I’m extremely excited about it.

Because the format doesn’t leave much time or space for links, here’s a list of things I mention in my slides:

09. September 2015 by Chad Haefele
Categories: General, Libraries/Info Sci, Links, Presentations | Leave a comment

Win a copy of WordPress for Libraries

Tuesday, August 25th 2015

bookcover

My book, WordPress for Libraries, is available now!

I’m giving away a copy to celebrate. To enter, all you have to do is leave a comment here or tweet me (@HiddenPeanuts) with #WPLib.

In your entry, tell me your email address (unless you enter on twitter – I’ll just message you there if you win) and one of three things:

  • Something you like about WordPress
  • Something you dislike about WordPress
  • Something you’d like to know about WordPress

Enter by 11:59PM EDT on Thursday, 9/3/15.
The contest is now over. Congrats to @verolynne!

Disclaimer: A couple of pages in your prize might be slightly creased by my assistant, pictured below.
IMG_20150819_173925

25. August 2015 by Chad Haefele
Categories: HP Updates, Libraries/Info Sci, Publications | 3 comments

Assess Your Website with Free Usability Testing Tools

Thursday, August 6th 2015

Back in April I did a webinar for NCLA’s Technology and Trends roundtable: “Assess Your Website with Free Usability Testing Tools”

I didn’t get around to posting it at the time, but the recording is freely available! I covered how to use tools like Optimal Workshop, Optimizely, and Marvel to do quick and free usability testing of your site. It’s a beginner-friendly presentation, starting with an intro to just what usability testing is and why it’s useful.

The slides are available below, but they probably make more sense if you just watch the recording instead.

Assess Your Website With Free Usability Testing Tools from chaefele

06. August 2015 by Chad Haefele
Categories: HowTo, Libraries/Info Sci | Leave a comment

Amazon Echo: The Case for Voice Commands

Monday, July 27th 2015

Windows 10 is almost upon us, just over a day away as I write. Among other new features, I’ve seen article after article talking about the integration of voice controls into Win10. Has their time finally arrived? For a long, long time I was skeptical of voice controls in any context. Way back in elementary school I played with an early version or Kurzweil Voice, and I was impressed if it got more than 10% of my speech right. I think that experience colored my expectations until very recently.

My Android phone has had voice commands built in for years, but other than setting timers or alarms I almost never use them. So for a while, I expected my use of Win10’s voice commands to run along the same lines: I’d think it was neat, play with it for a bit, and then forget about it entirely. Then in February my Amazon Echo arrived, and completely changed my thinking.

Amazon Echo

I bought the Echo almost on a whim, thinking once again that it would be a neat toy for a while but probably not have long term utility. I’m as surprised as anyone that now, four months later, I still use it multiple times a day. When I get home from work, I usually blurt out three commands as I unpack:

  • “Alexa, turn on the lights”: I have two lamps on a wemo switch, which the Echo controls.
  • “Alexa, how’s the traffic?”: The Echo reads me a report of the traffic between my daughter’s daycare and my home, giving me a rough idea of how long I have to make dinner before she and my wife arrive.
  • “Alexa, play NPR”: This one does what you’d expect – it plays a live stream of my local NPR station.

Then while I’m cooking, I usually ask Alexa to set a couple timers or add things to my shopping list. Later in the evening I often ask Alexa to play music by a certain band or in a given genre, and then I control the volume by voice commands too.

This is all done hands free, while I get other stuff done, and I almost never have to repeat myself or cancel a command the Echo heard incorrectly. We’ve come a long way since my arguments with Kurzweil Voice.

And ok, I’ll admit that I’m on the fence about just how useful it really is to have the Echo turn on lights for me. A plain old fashioned lightswitch is a pretty darn perfect UI already. But using a voice command to trigger lights still delights me in a Jetsons kind of way.

I didn’t set out to write a review of the Echo here (although if I did, I’d say it was totally worth the early bird $99 price but the current $179 is too steep of an ask). Instead, my point is that voice commands can fill some very valuable niches. I still don’t use voice for dictation, but it turns out voice recognition is a very good way to do a handful of things in my life. I can group them into general categories:

  • Asking for brief reports and updates like traffic, weather, or checking for new messages and alerts
  • Starting or stopping a background process, like a timer or music
  • Toggling a system setting like volume, wifi, and bluetooth connections

Today I do these things on my computer nearly constantly throughout the workday, without the benefit of voice commands. If Windows 10 lets me do them by voice instead, without breaking stride to open another program or dig through settings menus, that’s a bunch of small gains that will add up to a big improvement in how I work. I’m truly excited to try Win10’s voice recognition and see where it goes. Maybe you’ll even catch me dictating an email someday – but probably not in public.

27. July 2015 by Chad Haefele
Categories: Libraries/Info Sci, Ramblings, Reviews, Tech | 1 comment

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